16-01-24 This Week in Chemistry

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features how spruce cones could be an unlikely source for a carbon capture material, a frost-preventing coating inspired by a desert beetle, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.

Note: links to studies behind a journal paywall are indicated with (£). Studies without this symbol are open access, and can be accessed and read for free.

 

Featured Stories

Spruce cones as an unlikely carbon dioxide capture material: [Article] [Study (£)]

Colour-changing nanoparticles spot right-handed amino acids: [Article] [Study (£)]

Beetle-inspired chemical micropatterns keep surfaces frost-free: [Article] [Study (£)]

Compound with one of highest oxygen contents ever synthesised: [Article] [Study (£)]

Chemical fingerprints reveal fraudulent saffron: [Article] [Study (£)]

 

Other Stories This Week

Water-resistant perovskite cell maintains efficiency for three weeks: [Article] [Study (£)]

New material gives self-cleaning, anti-glare windows: [Article] [Study]

First metal complex containing single, double, & triple nitrogen bonds: [Article] [Study]

Interwoven organic chemicals form molecular fabric: [Article] [Study (£)]

Graphene oxide-based, touch-sensitive electronic devices: [Article] [Study (£)]

Using molecular ‘cannons’ to fire nanobullets of drugs into tissue: [Article] [Study (£)]

 

Keep track of older ‘This Week in Chemistry’ posts on the category page, or via the #TWIChem hashtag on Twitter.

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