16-03-13 This Week in Chemistry

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features a new noodly form of carbon, a bacteria that eats the plastic found in plastic bottles, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.

Note: links to studies behind a journal paywall are indicated with (£). Studies without this symbol are open access, and can be accessed and read for free.

 

Featured Stories

Newly discovered bacteria munches on a common plastic: [Article] [Study (£)]

New type of hydrogen bond involving boron discovered: [Article] [Study (£)]

Elastomer-based spray-on coating is most ice-repellent ever: [Article] [Study]

Heating sugar and salt creates new noodly form of carbon: [Article] [Study]

Fullerene cage allows hydrogen bond formation to be observed: [Article] [Study]

 

Other Stories This Week

Chemists synthesise fullered-like cage from titanium dioxide: [Article] [Study (£)]

Evidence that curium was present during the solar system’s formation: [Article] [Study]

Upcoming neon shortage could spell trouble for semiconductor manufacturers: [Article]

Combining Teflon & plastic to make a water-repellent surface: [Article] [Study (£)]

New phase of silagraphene predicted: [Article] [Study (£)]

Propylene glycol coating protects ham from ham mites: [Article] [Study (£)]

Molten salts help create organic compounds from carbon dioxide: [Article] [Study]

New coating helps fight prosthetic infections: [Article] [Study (£)]

 

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