16-04-17 This Week in Chemistry

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features gloves that use a compound found in green bananas and red wine to make catching fish less slippery, the reason why bearcats smell like buttered popcorn, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.

Note: links to studies behind a journal paywall are indicated with (£). Studies without this symbol are open access, and can be accessed and read for free. 

 

Featured Stories

Solar panel coating generates energy from raindrops: [Article] [Study (£)]

A single ion can influence several million water molecules: [Article] [Study]

New record set for longest linear carbon chain: [Article] [Study]

Astringent food compound inspires fish-catching gloves: [Article] [Study (£)]

Understanding why bearcats smell like popcorn: [Article] [Study (£)]

 

Other Stories This Week

Printer creates nanoscale features quickly: [Article] [Study]

First isolated compounds containing all-metal antiaromatic ring: [Article] [Study (£)]

New understanding of atmospheric nitric acid’s fate: [Article] [Study]

New methodology for the selective formation of chiral molecules: [Article] [Study (£)]

‘DNA machine’ can assemble chains of molecules: [Article] [Study]

New understandings of origin of gem-quality diamonds: [Article] [Study (£)]

Reclaiming mercury from fluorescent light bulbs: [Article] [Study (£)]

 

Keep track of older ‘This Week in Chemistry’ posts on the category page, or via the #TWIChem hashtag on Twitter.

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