• 17-03-12 This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – Earliest-known Oxygen Discovered, and a Canadian Town’s Water Turns Pink

By |March 12th, 2017|

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features news on why a Canadian town’s water turned pink, how a dual drug combination can be used to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and more. As always links to further articles and original research papers are provided below.

[…]

  • Famous Women in Chemistry History

International Women’s Day: Twelve Famous Female Chemists

By |March 7th, 2017|

Click to enlarge

March 8 is International Women’s Day. To mark the occasion, here’s a graphic which takes a quick look at a selection of pioneering female chemists! Click the above image to enlarge and learn more about each of the chemists featured, or download the PDF poster below.

[…]

  • C&EN AntiAging Preview

The Science Behind Anti-Aging Creams – Do They Really Work? In C&EN

By |March 6th, 2017|

Click to view full graphic on the C&EN site

This month’s edition of Periodic Graphics in C&EN takes a look at the science behind anti-aging creams – what compounds are found in them, and is there any proof that they can reverse the ravages of time on your skin? Click through the C&EN site to see the full graphic!

[…]

  • 17-03-05 This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – Sweeteners Help Detect Pee in the Pool, and an Opioid Without Side-Effects

By |March 5th, 2017|

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features new on how an artificial sweetener can help detect urine in swimming pools, a chemically-tweaked opioid which avoids common side effects in rats, and more. As always links to further articles and original research papers are provided below.

[…]

  • 02-28 Linus Pauling's Birthday

Today in Chemistry History – Linus Pauling and Electronegativity

By |February 28th, 2017|

Today, February 28, marks the birthday of Linus Pauling. For chemists Pauling likely needs no introduction; he’s famed for his work on the nature of chemical bonds and also on the structures of biological molecules. Here we take a brief look at one aspect of his work to which he lent his name: the Pauling electronegativity scale.

[…]

  • Finding More Stable Drugs Using Full Interaction Maps

Finding More Stable Forms of Drugs Using Full Interaction Maps

By |February 27th, 2017|

Click to enlarge

When pharmaceutical companies manufacture a drug, finding the drug’s most stable form is important. Not only do drugs become less effective as they degrade, limiting their useful shelf life, but if a more stable version of a drug is discovered after it has reached the market, products may end up being withdrawn, costing money. As a result, chemists are developing methods to evaluate drug stability, and using a “Full Interaction Maps” tool is one such computational method.

[…]

Load More Posts