• 2017 Nobel Prize Chemistry

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry – Revealing the structures of biomolecules with cryo-electron microscopy

By |October 4th, 2017|

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The last of this year’s Nobel Prizes, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry, was awarded today. This year’s prize went to the development of cryo-electron microscopy, a technique that allows the structures of biomolecules to be revealed where other techniques fail. It also gives scientists insights into how proteins move and interact with other molecules, as well as potentially improving our understanding of how drugs act on protein targets.

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  • 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics: Detecting gravitational waves from black hole collisions

By |October 3rd, 2017|

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This year’s second Nobel Prize in the sciences was awarded today. The prize for physics was awarded to researchers who contributed to the observation of gravitational waves, ripples in space-time that were originally created by colliding black holes over a billion years ago. 

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  • 2017 Nobel Prize Physiology-Medicine

The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology/Medicine: The molecular mechanisms behind circadian rhythms

By |October 2nd, 2017|

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The first of this year’s Nobel Prizes in Science was announced today! This year’s prize in physiology or medicine was awarded to Jeffrey C Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael W Young for their research into the molecular mechanisms behind circadian rhythms. 

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  • 17-10-01 This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – Tattoo ink nanoparticles concerns, and a scorpion that tweaks its venom

By |October 1st, 2017|

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features news on how a species of scorpion alters the chemicals in its venom in response to predators, a dioxin leak near Houston, and more. As always links to further articles and original research papers are provided below.

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  • The Chemistry of Poison Frogs

The chemistry of poisonous frogs, and how they avoid poisoning themselves

By |September 26th, 2017|

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The vibrant colours of poisonous frogs warn of the extremely toxic compounds contained in their skin. The amount of poison in one frog alone is estimated to be enough to kill 20,000 mice – but what are these compounds, where do they come from, and what makes the frogs immune to their effects? This graphic takes a look!

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  • 17-09-24 This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – Turning carbon dioxide into alcohol fuels, and detecting cocaine use using fingerprints

By |September 24th, 2017|

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features news on using a copper catalyst to turn carbon dioxide into alcohol fuels, a new test that uses fingerprints to detect cocaine use, and more. As always links to further articles and original research papers are provided below.

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