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C&EN Food Chemistry

Baking soda versus baking powder – in C&EN

Baking soda and baking powder: two common ingredients in baked goods. In the latest edition of Periodic Graphics in Chemical & Engineering News, we take a look at what these leavening agents are made of, what the difference is between them, and how they help your cookies, muffins, and cakes rise. View the full graphic […]

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Food Chemistry

How do plant milks compare to cow’s milk?

For plant milk manufacturers, business is booming. In 2021, 32% of British people surveyed drank plant-based milk as part of their diet, compared to 25% in 2020. How are these milks made, and how do they compare to cow’s milk when it comes to their environmental impact and nutritional value? This graphic takes a look.

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Food Chemistry

Faking flavours with chemistry: The science of artificial flavours – in C&EN

For over a century, chemists have made flavour molecules to evoke particular tastes. How do they know which compounds create a particular flavour, and how do they make these molecules? The latest edition of Periodic Graphics in Chemical & Engineering News takes a look. Visit the C&EN site to view the full graphic. View all the […]

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Biochemistry C&EN Food Chemistry

A guide to natural sweeteners – in C&EN

Sugars aren’t the only plant compounds you can use as sweeteners. The latest edition of Periodic Graphics in Chemical & Engineering News looks at the molecules in sweeteners from a variety of sources. View the full graphic on the C&EN site.

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Food Chemistry

The science of making porridge

Perfect porridge can be a challenge. Too lumpy, too runny, too stodgy – unpalatable porridge is a sadly common phenomenon. Here, we look at how science can provide pointers on getting porridge-making right.

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Food Chemistry

International Coffee Day: Arabica vs robusta

October 1 marks International Coffee Day. We’ve looked at various aspects of coffee chemistry on the site previously, but haven’t yet looked at the key divide between coffee beans: arabica and robusta. This graphic looks at the two types of coffee beans and some of their chemical differences.