Categories
Biochemistry

Dandelion chemistry: Diuretics and the tyres of the future

Dandelions: Loved by children, loathed by (most) gardeners. Often dismissed as a weed, dandelions lend themselves to several uses — and might be the solution to making more sustainable car tyres.

Categories
C&EN Food Chemistry

Baking soda versus baking powder – in C&EN

Baking soda and baking powder: two common ingredients in baked goods. In the latest edition of Periodic Graphics in Chemical & Engineering News, we take a look at what these leavening agents are made of, what the difference is between them, and how they help your cookies, muffins, and cakes rise. View the full graphic […]

Categories
C&EN Climate Crisis

How do solar panels work? – in C&EN

The current energy crisis has re-energised conversations around the switch to renewable resources. Solar panels are one of the options, so in this month’s edition of Periodic Graphics in Chemical & Engineering News, we take a look at how these panels generate electricity and some of the present and potential materials used in them. View […]

Categories
Biochemistry

Crocus chemistry: Saffron, colours, and poisonous imposters

Did you know that saffron is obtained from a type of crocus? This is a fact that had somehow escaped me, and which I only discovered when wondering why saffron contains a compound called ‘crocin’. Turns out that, yes, there is a connection!

Categories
Biochemistry C&EN

What common stimulants do we get from plants? – in C&EN

Stimulants produced by plants are among the most widely used drugs in the world. In the latest edition of Periodic Graphics in Chemical & Engineering News, we look at why plants make these compounds and the ways in which the molecules produce stimulant effects. View the full graphic on the C&EN site.

Categories
Women in Chemistry

International Women’s Day: Twelve women from chemistry history – pt. 4

Today (8 March) is International Women’s Day, so here’s another edition of the ‘Women in Chemistry History’ series. It highlights the contributions of another 12 women in chemistry, covering innovations from understanding cell ageing to testing for diseases.