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Chemistry in the News Coronavirus Medicinal Chemistry

Antibody tests, part 1: What can antibody tests tell us?

Have you already had COVID-19? Even if you’ve had symptoms consistent with it, you may not know for certain if you didn’t have a test at the time. But newly approved antibody tests may be able to tell you if you had the infection. What exactly can these tests tell us? Part one of this […]

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Biology Coronavirus Medicinal Chemistry

How does immunity work? In C&EN

When you recover from an infection, what stops you from catching it again? The latest edition of Periodic Graphics in C&EN looks at how our immune system responds to infections like coronavirus, how we can test to see if someone’s had an infection, and how vaccines work to prevent them. View the full graphic on […]

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Chemistry in the News Medicinal Chemistry

Coronavirus: How hand sanitisers protect against infections

As coronavirus continues its spread, panic-buying has swept supermarket shelves of hand sanitisers. What’s in these sanitisers and how effective are they in comparison to hand washing? This graphic takes a look.

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C&EN Medicinal Chemistry

Cannabidiol (CBD): Medicine from hemp – in C&EN

The first CBD-containing drug was approved in the US in 2018. This graphic looks at what this drug, Epidiolex, is used to treat and whether the increasing number of CBD supplements are effective. View the full graphic on the Chemical & Engineering News site.

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Biochemistry Medicinal Chemistry

What’s in an epidural? – Medications for labour and birth

As you might have picked up from previous pregnancy-related posts on the site (here and here), my wife and I have been expecting our first child. During labour and birth, terms like ‘epidural’, ‘gas and air’ and ‘induction of labour’ get thrown around, but what specific drugs do these involve? How do they work? What […]

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Biochemistry Chemunicate Medicinal Chemistry

From toxin to tonic: improving cone snail toxin stability for medical use

Cone snail toxins can be deadly to humans – but they also have potential uses in anaesthesia and to treat other medical conditions. This latest Chemunicate graphic takes a look at one way scientists are trying to optimise them for this use.