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C&EN Food Chemistry

The science of making cheese – in C&EN

Though there are hundreds of different types of cheese, their manufacture follows some common steps. In the latest edition of Periodic Graphics in Chemical & Engineering News, we take a look at the biochemical processes that turn milk into cheese. View the full graphic on the C&EN site.

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C&EN Food Chemistry

Baking soda versus baking powder – in C&EN

Baking soda and baking powder: two common ingredients in baked goods. In the latest edition of Periodic Graphics in Chemical & Engineering News, we take a look at what these leavening agents are made of, what the difference is between them, and how they help your cookies, muffins, and cakes rise. View the full graphic […]

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Food Chemistry

How is decaffeinated coffee made? The chemistry of coffee decaffeination

Caffeine is a stimulant, and the world’s most widely consumed psychoactive drug. Many of us need our morning coffee to be functional, but others prefer to avoid caffeine due to its effects on sleep, restlessness, or pregnancy. Handily, chemists have come up with several ways for us to enjoy coffee without the caffeine. Here, we […]

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Food Chemistry

Why is milk white? The chemistry of milk

  Yesterday, June 1, was World Milk Day. If you’re only learning this now and you’re disappointed at missing the opportunity to celebrate your love of all things milk, good news: there’s still time to learn about its chemistry! Chemistry can help answer a number of questions about milk, including why it’s white, and why […]

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Chemistry in the News Poison Chemistry

Fugu and tetrodotoxin: how the pufferfish can kill

  Pufferfish: kind of cute, right? Also kind of poisonous. They hit the news this week after a Japanese supermarket accidentally sold five packages of fugu (as it’s known in Japan) without removing the highly poisonous livers. This post looks at what makes them so poisonous.

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Food Chemistry

The flavour chemistry of your Thanksgiving turkey

Got the turkey in the oven for Thanksgiving? Here’s a brief look at the chemical compounds behind its flavour. There’s more on the reactions that produce these compounds in this graphic on the Maillard reaction. If you’re celebrating, happy Thanksgiving!