Categories
Biochemistry

The chemistry of tulips and tulip fingers

‘Tulip fingers’ might sound like a bizarre floral-themed version of Edward Scissorhands, but it’s actually a condition that can be caused by skin contact with tulip bulbs. It’s common amongst workers in the tulip industry, whose jobs involve sorting and packaging of tulip bulbs. This graphic takes a look at the compounds behind the condition.

Categories
Biochemistry

Do daffodils kill other flowers in vases?

Spring is here, and daffodils are blooming. You might have some in your garden, or you might pick some up at a florist to put in a vase at home. If you do, it’s a good idea to place them in a vase on their own – there are chemical reasons why daffodils and other […]

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C&EN Colourful Chemistry

The Chemistry of Dyeing Easter Eggs – in C&EN

With Easter just around the corner, this month’s edition of Periodic Graphics in C&EN takes a look at the chemistry behind the Easter tradition of dyeing eggshells different colours. Click to view the full graphic on the C&EN site!

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Biochemistry C&EN

The Chemistry of Daffodils – in C&EN

In the Northern Hemisphere spring is beginning to emerge from winter, heralded by the blooming of bright yellow daffodils. This graphic featured in C&EN a few years back and looks at some interesting chemical facets of this seasonal flower: what causes its smell, its colour, and a surprising link to Alzheimer’s treatments. View the full […]

Categories
Food Chemistry

The Chemistry of Wild Garlic

Spring is in the air, and it’s likely that, in your local forest, so too is the distinctive scent of wild garlic. Also known as ‘ramsons’ or ‘bear’s garlic’, green carpets of wild garlic swell in the forest’s undergrowth at this time of year. Here we take a look at their chemistry, and why, if […]