• Teflon: Its History & How it Works

Chemistry History: Teflon & Non-Stick Pans

February 4th, 2016|

On this day in 1941, Teflon, the polymer commonly found in non-stick pans, was patented. Its discovery actually occurred a few years previously – here’s a quick look at the story behind it, as well as the science behind its non-stick effect.

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  • 11 Confusing Chemical Element Symbols Explained

Element Oddities: 11 Confusing Chemical Symbols Explained

February 2nd, 2016|

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Most of the chemical symbols for elements in the periodic table make perfect sense; there are a small selection, however, that seem to bear no relation to their element’s name. After the periodic table of rejected element names a few days ago, questions about these elements came up, so here’s a look at their confusing symbols, along with the reasons behind them.

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  • 16-01-31 This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – Removing Metals from Water, & Sweat Chemistry Wearables

January 31st, 2016|

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features how milk proteins can be modified to remove heavy metals from water, a wearable sensor that allows sweat chemistry to be monitored, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.

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  • The Periodic Table of Rejected Elements

A Periodic Table of Rejected Element Names

January 30th, 2016|

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Extremium, catium, cyclonium and pandemonium: elements that you won’t find in the periodic table in classrooms and laboratories. However, they’re all names that have been suggested but rejected for elements in years gone by. This table takes a look at some of the different names that have been suggested or used in the past for various elements; below, we examine their origins, and the reasons for their rejection.

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  • Flint Water Crisis

Lead in the Water – The Flint Water Crisis

January 25th, 2016|

You’ve likely heard of the terrible water crisis currently afflicting the city of Flint, Michigan, in the United States. The city’s water supply contains very high levels of lead, which is well-known to cause serious health issues. This lead is coming from the pipes that bring water to the city from the Flint River, but how is it getting into the water that the residents are drinking? Here’s a few quick explanations to some of the chemistry-related questions surrounding the story.

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  • 16-01-24 This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – Spruce Cone Carbon Capture, & Saffron Fraud Revealed

January 24th, 2016|

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features how spruce cones could be an unlikely source for a carbon capture material, a frost-preventing coating inspired by a desert beetle, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.

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