This Week in Chemistry – 3D Holograms, & 170-Year Old Champagne

04/26/2015

15-04-26 - This Week in Chemistry

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features the most accurate clock ever created, analysis of 170-year old champagne, a new method for generating 3D holograms, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.

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Chemical Reactions: Lead Iodide & ‘Golden Rain’

04/23/2015
Chemical Reactions: Lead Iodide & 'Golden Rain'

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Kicking off an occasional new series of graphics with today’s post, which’ll be looking at common chemical reactions encountered in schools. Today kicks off with one of my favourite reactions, the ‘Golden Rain’ demonstration, which involves the synthesis and recrystallisation of lead (II) iodide, and is commonly used to illustrate the recrystallisation process, as well as to demonstrate differences in solubilities.

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The Chemistry of Gin (And Tonic!)

04/21/2015
The Chemistry of Gin

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For the fifth in the ‘Alcohol Chemistry’ series, we turn to gin. As with other types of alcohol, there are a huge number of different chemical compounds present, but it’s possible to identify a range of significant chemical contributors to its aroma & flavour. Here, we take a look at those compounds and where they come from.

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This Week in Chemistry – Vodka & Chromatography, & Detecting Decaying Meat

04/19/2015

15-04-19 - This Week in Chemistry

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features a potential explanation for the energy source for the dynamo that powers Earth’s magnetic field, how the household sponge could help fight BPA contamination in industrial waste water, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.

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Why Shouldn’t You Eat Rhubarb Leaves? – The Chemistry of Rhubarb

04/16/2015
The Chemistry of Rhubarb

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Field-grown rhubarb will shortly be coming into season and appearing in supermarkets in the UK, so it seems like a good time to take a look at the chemistry behind this odd-looking vegetable. It’s mostly used in pies and desserts, but it’s only the stalks of the plant that we eat – and there’s a reason for that. This graphic takes a look at why, and also looks at the chemical compounds that contribute to the colour and the laxative effect of rhubarb.

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Neonicotinoid Pesticides & Bee Colonies

04/14/2015
Neonicotinoid Pesticides & Their Effect on Bee Colonies - The Facts

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Neonicotinoid pesticides have, not for the first time, been hitting the news over the past few weeks. The commonly used chemicals help keep pests from decimating crops, but have been linked with negative effects on other organisms, in particular bee colonies. This graphic and article take a look at what we know about the neonicotinoids, and the evidence for their suggested impacts.

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This Week in Chemistry – A Rapid-Charging Aluminium Battery, & Fracking Pollution Concerns

04/12/2015

15-04-12 - This Week in Chemistry

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features a ‘smart’ window that can harness energy from the weather to change colour, a renewed debate over lawrencium’s position in the periodic table, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.

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A Rough Guide to Types of Scientific Evidence

04/09/2015
A Rough Guide to Types of Scientific Evidence

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Today’s graphic looks at science in general, rather than just chemistry. It’s in a similar vein to the Rough Guide to Spotting Bad Science posted last year, but this time looking at the hierarchy of different types of scientific evidence. You might think science is science, but some evidence is ranked higher in the scientific community than others, and having an awareness of this can help you sort the science from the pseudoscience when it comes to various internet claims.

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Analytical Chemistry – A Guide to 13-C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)

04/07/2015
Analytical Chemistry - 13-C NMR Chemical Shifts

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In previous entries in the Analytical Chemistry series of graphics, we’ve looked at some of the tools that chemists can use to determine the identity of compounds in various samples, including infrared spectroscopy and hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Today looks another similar method, that of carbon NMR; the graphic provides some general information on interpreting the resultant spectra, whilst we’ll briefly discuss how these signals are created below.

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This Week in Chemistry – Bouncing Batteries, & a Medieval MRSA Remedy

04/05/2015

15-04-05 - This Week in Chemistry

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features the development of a new self-healing coating that confers both water and fire resistance to cotton, a perfume release system that releases fragrance in the presence of moisture, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.

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