• 15-05-24 - This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – Flowers & Urea, & Self-Destructing Devices

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features how urea could help flower blooms last longer, electronic devices that self-destruct when heating, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.

  • The Chemistry of Spider Venom

The Chemistry of Spider Venom

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Spiders are the most numerous venomous animals on the planet; the number of species predicted to be in existence, 150,000, is thought to be greater than the numbers of all other venomous creatures combined. Almost all spiders, with only a few exceptions, produce venom, which serves the primary purpose of immobilising their prey. However, the content of this venom can vary wildly from species to species, and the majority are not harmful to humans. This graphic takes a look at some of the different possible components, and their roles in venoms.

  • A Guide to Chemical Hazard Symbols

A Guide to Chemical Hazard Symbols

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Back to some chemistry basics for today’s post, with a look at the nine different hazard symbols commonly used to warn of chemical dangers. These symbols are frequently encountered in the lab – and also on some household products – and whilst some are self-explanatory, others can require a little more in the way of explanation, which is what this graphic aims to do.

  • 15-05-17 - This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – Sunscreen from Fish Skin, & Viagra’s Anti-Malarial Potential

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features a compound isolated from zebrafish that has potential for use as a sunscreen, how cocaine use can be detected from a single fingerprint, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.

  • The Chemistry of Permanent Hair Dye Colours

The Chemistry of Permanent Hair Dyes

Today, hair dyes are widely used, either to cover up grey hairs, or simply by those wanting to change their natural hair colour. The chemistry behind how they change the colour of hair can actually get pretty complicated, but this graphic tries to boil it down to the key classes of chemicals involved, and an overview of the process that produces the dye molecules.

  • 15-05-10 - This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – Espresso Machine Extraction, & Onion Skin Artificial Muscle

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features how gold-plated onion skin cells can be used to make artificial muscle, how the humble coffee machine can be used for a chemical extraction, and more. As always, links to further articles and original research papers are provided below, as well as further studies of interest not included in the graphic.