• 07-25 – Rosalind Franklin's Birthday

Today in Chemistry History – Rosalind Franklin and the structure of DNA

By |July 25th, 2017|

Rosalind Franklin was born on this day in 1920. Her contributions to the discovery of the structure of DNA were key; she took photos of DNA’s structure using X-ray crystallography, and it was these photos which informed the work of Watson and Crick’s model of DNA’s structure. Sadly her contributions were not fully recognised until after her death, and she did not share in the award of the Nobel Prize for the discovery of DNA’s structure as the prize is not awarded posthumously.

[…]

  • 17-07-23 This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – Polymer pulleys boost Li-ion batteries, and blooming 3D printed flowers

By |July 23rd, 2017|

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features research on how a polymer pulley system could make silicon anodes in lithium batteries workable, a 3D printed flower that uses the shape memory of a polyurethane polymer to bloom when exposed to light, and more. As always links to further articles and original research papers are provided below.

[…]

  • 17-07-16 This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – Tomato chemicals and caterpillar cannibalism, and a Big Bang BaZnGa compound

By |July 16th, 2017|

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features research on how tomato plant chemicals can drive caterpillars to cannibalism, a chemical compound inspired by Big Bang Theory, and more. As always links to further articles and original research papers are provided below.

[…]

  • C&EN - The Chemistry of Frozen Desserts Preview

The Chemistry of Frozen Desserts – in C&EN

By |July 13th, 2017|

Click to view full image on C&EN site

Ever wondered what the difference is between ice cream, gelato, and sorbet? This month’s edition of Periodic Graphics in C&EN is here to help out! Click through the the C&EN site to view the full graphic.

[…]

  • The Chemistry of Lavender & How it Repels Moths

Why Can Lavender Be Used to Repel Moths? – The Chemistry of Lavender

By |July 10th, 2017|

Click to enlarge

Hanging in the wardrobes of our flat, alongside our clothes, are a couple of small bags of dried lavender. Like many others, we keep them there to ward off clothes moths, but while offhandedly discussing this a couple of weeks ago I realised that I had absolutely no idea if there was scientific evidence to back up this repellent effect. So, I did what any good scientist would, and started a quest to find out whether lavender’s anti-moth powers were the real deal, or as scientifically holey as the moth-eaten clothes it claims to ward against!

[…]

  • 17-07-09 This Week in Chemistry

This Week in Chemistry – The Secrets of Roman Concrete, and Bactericidal Compounds on Mars

By |July 9th, 2017|

Here’s the weekly summary of both new chemistry research and studies that have been in the news. This week features research on why Roman concrete is stronger than modern concrete, the discovery that bactericidal compounds form on the surface of Mars, and more. As always links to further articles and original research papers are provided below.

[…]

Load More Posts